Twitter Diversity Report Reveals Poor Results

Twitter

Finally succumbing to the pressures and demands of the public, Twitter released the gender and ethnic breakdown of its company on Wednesday, and unsurprisingly it looks like most other major technology companies: overwhelmingly male, white and Asian.

Data from the reports show that nearly 90% of Twitter’s workers are white or Asian in the U.S. And more than 90% of technology jobs in the U.S. are held by whites or Asians.

According to figures released by the company’s vice president for diversity and inclusion, Janet Van Huysse, men make up 70% of all staff but 90% of technology staff.

Contrastingly, more than a quarter of black Internet users in the U.S. are on Twitter and “Black Twitter” — the congregation of black users on the service — is considered one of the driving forces behind the company’s popularity and success.

The numbers are telling and Twitter pledged to take steps to diversify its staff.

“We want to be more than a good business; we want to be a business that we are proud of,” Huysse said.

Twitter is the latest of the most powerful companies in Silicon Valley to report the diversity of their workforce. Yahoo, Google, Facebook and LinkedIn have all reported that their staffs are between 62% and 70% male. Whites and Asians make up between 88% and 91%.

Though Twitter followed suit after those major companies released their data, the real pressure came when Rev. Jesse Jackson, his Rainbow PUSH Coalition and the civil rights organization ColorofChange.org began campaigning last week that the company share their demographics.

“The numbers are pathetic but this is a step in the right direction,” Rev. Jesse Jackson said in an interview Wednesday.

Jackson wants to make sure Twitter and the other companies in Silicon Valley are actively working towards a diversity plan.

“We are going to come back out there real soon and begin to convene Silicon Valley companies to work out a plan with them to achieve inclusion,” he said.

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